Five things #5

“T. K. hates a lot of things, but at the moment, it’s how she becomes the #1 target during dodgeball at gym. Everything changes, however, when she discovers that she has the ace ability to direct spherical objects — and she makes her classmates pay! But her powers are made for more than petty revenge, as she soon discovers while on a family vacation.” How to Move Spheres and Influence People is a short story set in the Wild Cards universe.

In Arctic Siberia, Russian scientists are trying to stave off catastrophic climate change by resurrecting an Ice Age biome complete with lab-grown woolly mammoths. Welcome to Pleistocene Park.

“The space between fiction and reality is where economic bubbles take shape.” Brent Goldfarb and David A Kirsch explore The economics of bubbles.

Going back a few months, Salman Rushdie discusses what Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five tells us now.

And finally, Antergos Linux is dead, long live EndeavourOS. Antergos was my main operating system for several years — I keep meaning to take a look at how well EndeavourOS has picked up the baton of being a newcomer friendly introduction to the occasionally painful world of Arch-based distributions.

Quote of the day: Reality Check

International trade is dirty, that’s why we need rules. By advocating unilateral free trade, ‘liberal’ Leavers are bringing chocolate spoons to a knife fight. U.K. industry will be decimated.

Chris Kendall on why it takes a large economic power to retaliate against such protectionist measures such as those imposed by the U.S. against Bombardier.

On Hayek and Liberalism

David Boyle makes an interesting point.

It seems to me that the Left’s narrative about neoliberalism is too naive to overcome it – it understands none of the appeal of its original ideas. It is somewhat vacuous – a fairy tale about nasty people overturning the great and enlightened Keynesian consensus of 1945.

Until we can develop a better understanding of where neoliberalism came from, and why it became such a perversion of itself, we will never force a path beyond the neoliberal consensus we need.

Maybe now would be a good time to take another look at Hayek. Or a first look, in my case.