Oops

Spare a thought for Zottegem, a small town in East Flanders where a number of public-spirited residents decided to set up a horror trail — a six kilometre walk along which walkers can find horror stories from the local history.

Unfortunately, they forgot to mention it to anyone. So when someone saw a couple of pairs of legs poking out of a pond, the emergency services were called and the police, the fire brigade and an ambulance all converged on the banks of the pond to rescue… Two pairs of fake legs.

Now that people know about it, the horror trail is staying up until Christmas and I think the residents behind it deserve full marks for public spiritedness and thinking creatively about things to do during lockdown. They do lose a few points, however, for causing a panic.

Brexit: the Digby Jones Jobs Lost Index

Back in 2016, Lord Digby Jones, a vocal proponent of Brexit, inanely asserted that “There’s not going to be any economic pain. If there are job losses, they will be very few”.

As late as January 2019 he was still maintaining “not a single job” would be lost because of Brexit.

In a darkly humorous move, Yorkshire Bylines have come up with the Digby Jones Jobs Lost Index.

It’s a list that keeps on growing.

All’s fair in love and (cod) war

Flanders will use charter from 1666 to guarantee post-Brexit fishing rights

The Flemish government argues it can invoke a charter that dates back to 1666 to secure its right to fish in U.K. waters if there’s no deal on fisheries before the end of the Brexit transition period.

It turns out that King Charles II granted “eternal access” to fifty fishermen from Bruges way back in 1666.

It sounds like a joke, but a spokesperson for Flemish Fisheries Minister, Hilde Crevits has claimed that the charted “has been confirmed by a U.K. lawyer in 1820.”

That’s a mere ten years before Belgium was founded.

After seeking legal guidance, the government of Flanders has sent a copy of the charter to the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier.

One of the things I love about living in Belgium is the surrealism of the country’s politics.